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12,267 posts on 2,439 threads   •   From Mar 07, 2004 - Jan 08, 2012

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Message Author Message Content   (1 of 55)
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David Wiencke
(Member)

Got a couple of shots of the big jenny close-hauled in about 5kt wind.

luff 41'2", foot 25'10", leech 39'2


Message Author Message Content   (2 of 55)
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Stephen Yoder
(Member)

David Wiencke wrote:

Elena's combing

Yep, that's it. Kind of hard to see in this photo. I have a higher res version that I'll e-mail to Jay. Maybe he can put it on the site somewhere.
-Steve
(see above messages - Jay)
Last modified: October 20, 2011 7:15 PM | Jay Bietz (Administrator)

Message Author Message Content   (3 of 55)
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Stephen Yoder
(Member)

Terence Singh wrote:Having sailed Liberate some 1400 miles south down the west coast I am more than pleased with her sea worthiness....One area that I must attend to is her ability to keep the crew in the Cockpit wet in heavy seas. There is a definite need to try and retrofit cockpit combings that prevent seas washing don the decks and flooding the cockpit. Is there any advice by trial and or error for a suitable design? any suggestions on Fiberglass versus wood? Any opinions on the Hans Christian style Dam versus Combings?
Terence,
Check out this elegant solution on W32 Myskatonic (formerly Elena):

whoops! Guess I haven't figured out how to post photos to this new version of the forum. I'll get back to you.

-Steve
Last modified: October 20, 2011 7:15 PM | Jay Bietz (Administrator)

Message Author Message Content   (4 of 55)
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David Wiencke
(Member)

I have a large genoa made by Westsail; Luff 41'2" Foot 25'10" Leech 39'2"

It makes all the difference for sailing to windward in winds under 15kts. Off the wind we could carry it in up to 18-20kts. On anything fatter than a close reach we can add the stays'l to give us about another half kt in boat speed. Here's a clip http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OGVswlhZjLA

I have the quick-release forestay and use it if we're tacking alot, but if I only have to tack once or twice, and feeling lazy can get that genoa through the slot with some help from the wind. The super yankee dimensions might be what you're looking for. Aaron compiled a list of sail dimensions and it might be somewhere on this site. Aaron?

My super yankee is a little smaller than Kern's, but the cut is such that the sheets can be lead between the upper and lower stays getting a flatter trim and closer to the wind. Here, in 12-15kts.

Luff 41'6" Foot 18'2" Leech 32'8"


Message Author Message Content   (5 of 55)
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Gary Burton
(Member)

A lightweight reacher/drifter might be the ticket. That sail will be good up to about
10 knots and then your yankee/staysail/main will take over nicely..
I have a lightweight assym but it is not cut flat enough in my opinion...
although we are still able to get to about 50 apparent.
It might be worthwhile to talk to Kern about this.
I noticed that Dave Kings reacher/drifter seems to be built out of more
appropriate
material in the right places...unless that is just reinforcing.

Saraband:



Elizabeth Ann: Assym with too much belly to use as effective reacher/drifter


Last modified: October 16, 2011 7:40 PM | Gary Burton

Message Author Message Content   (6 of 55)
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Stephen Wylie
(Member)

I have had hawse pipes manufactured to original specs, out of spun naval bronze.

The first run was for 14 sets, there are 8 left at this point in time.

I had to commission the metal spinner to build the tool and, as I am not a registered business, I had to pay sales tax on the finished product.

The remaining 8 sets will be sold for my cost plus 10% so that I can eventually pay for the tool - that works out to $156 per set. I'll have to sell about 36 sets to cover the cost of the tool. Pipes are on eBay:

www.ebayitem.com/250910724958

I am shipping from Canada. Factor in customs and brokerage in your cost calculations, but as they are made in Canada, under NAFTA there is no duty.

These are "plug-and-play" exact replicas of the originals. Installation should be snap, once you get the old ones off.

Future runs of hawse pipes will have a different price.If, down the line, several members want to buy these in bulk I can talk to the manufacturer to do another run. I think the minimum is 14 sets. Enough demand would justify my arranging a wholesaler's tax exemption and should lower the cost.

If anyone is interested in the remaining 8, let me know.

Update: Oct 14, 2011

Two more are sold, there are 6 SETS left.

Update Oct 15, 2011:

Inquiries on four more sets, not sold yet. I have created an eBay item to pay a DEPOSIT for one set from the next run of pipes.

Manufacturing/delivery is dependent on interest.

www.ebayitem.com/250911665736

(I am typing from an iPad and can't figure out how to make that link work. Just cut and paste it into the address bar of your browser)

Update Oct. 16, 2011

4 sets left. First shipment should be taking delivery today. Looking forward to feedback.

Installed my first two in about 1 hour for each, including removing the old one.

Update Nov. 10, 2011

2 sets of hawsepipes left, that is two individual hawsepipes - after those are sold, it will be pay a deposit and wait until enough sign up before the next run is commissioned.

FYI, as per Bud's suggestion, if enough signed up for it, the run could be out of stainless steel instead of bronze, if that's the consensus (but I like the bronze).


Last modified: November 10, 2011 3:37 PM | Stephen Wylie

Message Author Message Content   (7 of 55)
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Dick Mills
(Administrator)

What Jay said is correct. However, I think some WOA members are still having trouble. I think their trouble is that COPY/PASTE does not work here in forum posts, unless the COPY source is the WOA member album. Try the more specific procedure below.
My procedure is clunky but it works. This forum software is not very easy to use. My procedure may not be the only one that works. I have a MS Windows machine, I know nothing about Macs.
  1. Make sure you are logged in to westsail.org using your email and password.

  2. Open two browser windows (or two tabs, same thing).

  3. In window 1 navigate to the WOA forum you want to create a post in. Click CREATE TOPIC. The edit pane should open to allow you to type your text.

  4. In window 2, open westsail.org, then click on VIEW PROFILE on the lower left. Your profile page will appear. There you can change your address or other personal information. Click MEMBER PHOTO ALBUMS near the top of the page. There you can click on ADD ALBUM or click on an existing album. You should then see a button UPLOAD PHOTOS. Click on that to upload one or more photos to the WOA site.

  5. Now, still in window 2, looking at your album of photos, choose a photo and double click on the thumbnail it so that it appears large. Right right click on that. A pop up menu appears. Choose COPY IMAGE. (if you would rather put it in your post as thumbnail side, right click on the thumbnail instead .)

  6. Return to window 1, move the cursor to the place in your post where you want the picture to go and press CTRL-C to paste the picture in at that place. I just tried it with the rainbow picture below. (There is no feature to change the size of a photo after paste. Again, the forum software is clunky.)

  7. Repeat steps 5 and 6 again for each additional photo.


Last modified: 05 Oct 2011 9:27 AM | Jay Bietz (Administrator)

Message Author Message Content   (8 of 55)
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Unknown
(Unregistered User)

Tate:

2 years ago I changed the cockpit drains to the location below.

One on each side ... I don't have photos of the rerouting of the drain in the engine compartment but this link is to my photos of the repower done at the same time.

As of this haul out, I have removed all but 3 thru hull's - one for each "sink" and the seawater inlet for the engine.

Hope this helps.

Jay Bietz


Message Author Message Content   (9 of 55)
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Werner Hamp
(Member)

Aaron,

Thanks for the response. That forward battery is a real pain to service even when you are in the engine room anyway. I have a tendency to let that one slide with the inevitable result. It takes a mirror and some yoga to get it done and this is just the ticket.

Thanks again,

Werner

Anyone interested in a group buy attempt?

:


Message Author Message Content   (10 of 55)
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Unknown
(Unregistered User)

Thomas Koehl wrote:Jack, I love your schematic diagrams and the system seems pretty logical. I've yet to load up for a trip but still manage to misplace items and have to spend ten minutes opening/emptying lockers and drawers to find that one thing I desperately need! Send me a copy too! -Tom

Thanks, Tom

Although my layout is standard, the reference to standard is somewhat obscure, since the layouts changed from year to year and because all had optional add-ons. Also, I've added a whole new section of cabinets above the settee where there used to be just a narrow shelf. I extended the existing cabinets below the shelf by about 9 inches and built storage above the extended shelves. The result is an area wider than the original shelf, but narrower than the optional pilot berth that provides a great deal of easily accessible extra storage. The forward two-thirds has facing with doors. The aft third is used for my printer/scanner, short-wave radio, etc. When under way, it has a removable face that becomes a laptop table on a pedestal, when at anchor. While these compartments are indicated on the template, they would obviously not exist on most boats.




Note that I changed the naming convention from the original posting above. In most cases, storage compartments have a single alpha char (sometimes 2), followed by a number. The alpha prefixes are as follows...


  • FP = Forecastle (Port)
  • FS = Forecastle (Stbd)
  • FC = Forecastle (Cntr)
  • H = Head
  • W = Wardrobe
  • D = Dinette
  • S = Settee
  • G = Galley
  • N = Nav Station
  • B = Bilge or Basement
  • C = Cockpit


Since most of the areas are on either the Port or Starboard side, a single alpha char was sufficient. In the Forecastle, however, the second designation of "P", "S" or "C" were used for clarification. I numbered the areas in the sequence of fore to aft, outboard to inboard, and top to bottom. There may be minor exceptions, resulting from the difficulty in making a 2-dimensional representation of what is a 3-dimensional reality.


While it's likely that my layout is somewhat different from your's (or anyone else's), I'd be happy to make a custom representation for your boat when we get together in Florida. In the mean time, if you have only looked at the images in this post, be sure you look at the demo. Although it isn't set up such that you can actually change the values, it should sufficiently illustrate the intent. When I have a bit more time, I might try to turn this into an executable application that does not require a user to install MySQL and PHP within a localhost web server. This would allow anybody to use it and customize for their boat. Typically, adding this kind of customization requires somewhere in the neighborhood of 10x the programming. In programming, the simpler something looks, the more time it likely took to develop.


W3 Inventory Manager Demo


Jack


Last modified: 11 Sep 2011 10:34 PM | Jack Webb

Message Author Message Content   (11 of 55)
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Braden Prickett
(Administrator)

Werner Hamp wrote:

P.S. Braden-Can you give me the details on the distributor in Jupiter? I'm only a couple hours "up the road" from there.


Sure, as I understand it, the Jupiter location is their US HQ which also includes the warehouse distributer.

There is a small lobby that has each of their products on display - they are not hooked up to power, but otherwise are available for a hands-on experience.

This picture from their website is exactly what it looks like, we picked our unit up at one of the three dock bays on the left side:

engel

Message Author Message Content   (12 of 55)
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Rosemary Wilson
(Member)

Gary Burton wrote:Rosemary - do you have T-track on the front of the mast to run a car up and down on? From reading between the lines it seems you have a fixed fitting on the mast in the position the pole would clip into if you were using the spinnaker pole....but when you raise the pole it is not clipped to anything. Is this correct?
I'm also trying to figure out the best way to stow the pole on the mast and will probably stow it like Aaron does with the inboard end on a t-track car, but don't know the best way to move the car up and down. I suspect a car with lead attachments on either end, with line attached going through a block at the top of the t-track, and the same below the t-track would be best..a continuous line......with a way to tie off the line or a small clutch arrangement would work best.

sail mast car toogle

you're right in some respects Gary - the pole does have a fixed fitting but the swivel is on the pole. There is a pin that goes through the fitting and through a hole in the "mast end" of the pole. The pole is dipped when gybing as the mast fitting stays on. I have toyed with the idea of putting a track on the mast but if I can figure this out, I suspect I won't need to. I need to take some pictures I guess. The Shark that I race on has a traveller arrangement on a track that would work for that purpose though. If I had something like that, I could stow the pole like Aaron does and send the mast end up and clip at the turnbuckle.

Message Author Message Content   (13 of 55)
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Jay Bietz
(Administrator)

I'm pretty happy with a Furlex furler - I find that the line will over wrap on the drum - unless I drag the line while deploying to keep wrap tight. I think it's been in use 5+ years on the SF Bay. Came with a new forestay and pretty good directions - installed it myself.

Last modified: 25 Aug 2011 8:08 PM | Jay Bietz (Administrator)

Message Author Message Content   (14 of 55)
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Jay Bietz
(Administrator)

I've had a message from a member that Kern Ferguson is now a pilot in Alaska -

I found a FB page image of Kern (I think).

The good news is that Westsailors now have a friend flying trade AK and we also still have a sailmaker. I just talked to Kern (8/10/2011) and he is busy with both enterprises and would love to make your sails as well as fly you into the outback in Alaska for hunting / fishing etc.

I've invited him to the Northern CA rendezvous and hopfully he will have the time to join us September 30 - October 2, 2011.


Message Author Message Content   (15 of 55)
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Jack Webb
(Member)

Jay Bietz wrote:
Werner Hamp wrote:

Hi Tom,

Having reached the limit of my patience in trying to post original images, I have piggybacked a "Lazy Jacks" page onto one of my web sites. This is a diagram and explanation of the system. As I said, the total cost was somewhere around $ 50.00 in 2000 as I only had to buy the carabiners and blocks the rest being on hand.

http://www.my-flashcards.com/rhapsody/

Werner


This is Werner's image from his site -- nice illustratation....and the stack pak is a real nice bonus to the system.

On Pygmalion I find the that the above works pretty good.

Right click on the image and paste into the reply and resize to fit.

Jay



Jay,

If you look at images in all these posts (or the lack thereof), you will clearly see the inherent problems with this method of posting images. And if you look through the somewhat limited posts made since February, you'll see several more examples of this "here today, gone tomorrow" phenomenon. What a shame to lose all these valuable contributions!

You might recall that in a previous post, I clearly defined this and many other issues with the current hosting solution, in hopes that at least some of them might be resolved.

So far, the most progress we've seen is "I'm experimenting with Google Search on our forum's only - Update - I've modified the script slightly 0619/2011 to hopefully include the subtopics. - Update the sub topics look to be out of touch with the google search. Jay". (I'm really not sure how one would interpret this malformed statement, but obviously experiment that didn't work.)

Fortunately, I'm getting thousands of hits on http://Westsail.info, so at least members are still able to find what they need. And not only can that site be searched, its current Google search placement has already substantially passed the Westsail.org site, with every single post has been indexed at least once. (Yes... I actually track every hit, including those by search engines, in order to continually enhance the site, without unsuccessful experiments.)

At this point, I'm still directing forum posts back to the "WOA Official Forum". It's been suggested by many that I should go ahead and make it a replacement. I'm patiently (or impatiently) hoping, however, that something is done to fix the issues so I don't need to do so! I guess the outcome is in your hands. Can you save it?




Message Author Message Content   (16 of 55)
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Dick Mills
(Administrator)

Today seems like the perfect time to publish a list of tips on how to beat the heat while cruising. Below are some things we've been doing on Tarwathie recently while cruising The Erie Canal in New York.
  • While under way, the helmsman stays under protection of the bimini all the time. Pity the prior owners of Tarwathie, they had no bimini.

  • The boat has considerable thermal inertia. Even on the hottest day it stays cooler in the cabin until about 1500. But then it remains too hot until 2300 at night. By the way, thank God it does cool at night around here. We have no trouble sleeping.

  • I tried wetting down the decks and hull hoping to cool down the walls. It has no noticeable effect. I think we would need continue the wet down for an hour or more to make a difference.

  • We use muffin fans in the cabin and point them directly at our heads.

  • Drink lots of fluids

  • Yesterday I bought a package of Popsicle twin pops. Eating half a pop every hour or so during the day is a great pick up.

  • (See the picture) We have a battery operated gadget that lets you spray water mist on yourself as you hold a fan. Directed at the head and the back of the neck it works well.


  • I have a floppy hat with a wide brim to keep the sun off. On the hot days I put the hat on the end of a boat hook and dunk it in the river. Then I put it on my head soaking wet. That feels really good.

  • Seek shelter when possible. Lounging in an air conditioned library, or a store is a great strategy. Failing that, go for the shade of a grove of trees near the water.

  • Avoid the hottest hours. Travel from 0600-1200 is more comfortable than 1200-1800. We can also take evening walks and sit outside to vacate the boat after dinner until bed time. The only trouble with that is the mosquito hour around sunset. We've been using lots of bug spray this week.

  • Go jump in the lake (or the river). Where the water is clean, cool, and free of nasty creatures, taking a plunge is what I call "instant attitude adjustment" The Chesapeake Bay is full of sea nettles, the man-made sections of the Erie Canal have dirty water, the Mohawk and Hudson rivers are OK, Lake Champlain waters are perfect for swimming.

  • Most important, seek the proper latitude. Migrate!

    With her heavy displacement, much of the hull in a W32 is under water. Ambient water temperature has a major influence on comfort in the cabin. Below are some rough numbers for the USA East Coast. Temperatures in degrees F
Latitude Place Summer water temp Winter water temp
47 Halifax, Nova Scotia 50 33
45 Penobscot Bay, Maine 60 36
45 Lake Champlain, Vermont 70 frozen
42 Erie Canal, New York 80 frozen
38 Chesapeake Bay, Maryland 80 35
25 Florida 90 75

Message Author Message Content   (17 of 55)
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Thomas Rogers
(Member)

Sea Gypsy (Hull #743) is berthed in Northwest Florida. After suffering through one very hot summer with no air, the wife & I decided we must find a way to cool the cabin. We looked into permanent, water cooled systems and were appalled at the cost and the fact that we would need to have the boat hauled to drill yet two more holes in her bottom. We were in Lowe's one afternoon and found ourselves looking at window unit air conditioners. I've seen these used on sailboats with varying degrees of success and some really horrible installations. The price, under $100 for a 5000 BTU unit was far more attractive than the permanent version. So maybe there was a way to do it without trashing the boat. We decided against using the forward hatch because of the difficulty in directing both the supply air and return air correctly into the cabin. Also installation over the forward hatch would make accessing the controls difficult. We finally decided the companionway was the right location. After a little engineering and some time in AutoCAD, here's what we constructed;


After constructing with some spare mahogany plywood & trim and several coats of varnish, here's what the final product looked like installed;




The chock on the top is a carrying handle. When we are ready to go sailing, I just unplug, lift it out the companionway. and off we go! The 5000 BTU is sufficient for keeping the main cabin nice & cool, but at night with two adults in the V-berth we have to use a small fan to help circulate the cool air forward. A larger A/C unit might cool better, but it also presents difficulty in fitting into the companionway. Not shown in this picture is the condensate drain hose I attached to the bottom of the unit and drain into one of the cockpit scuppers.
Last modified: 20 Jul 2011 9:08 PM | Jay Bietz (Administrator)

Message Author Message Content   (18 of 55)
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James Best
(Member)

Jay Bietz wrote:
Werner Hamp wrote:

Hi Tom,

Having reached the limit of my patience in trying to post original images, I have piggybacked a "Lazy Jacks" page onto one of my web sites. This is a diagram and explanation of the system. As I said, the total cost was somewhere around $ 50.00 in 2000 as I only had to buy the carabiners and blocks the rest being on hand.

http://www.my-flashcards.com/rhapsody/

Werner


This is Werner's image from his site -- nice illustratation....and the stack pak is a real nice bonus to the system.

On Pygmalion I find the that the above works pretty good.

Right click on the image and paste into the reply and resize to fit.

Jay


Thanks for your info. This gives me a lot to work with. What size of rope did you use and how many feet is needed in total? During sailing do you unattach from the boom and stow on the shrouds?

Message Author Message Content   (19 of 55)
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Jay Bietz
(Administrator)

Werner Hamp wrote:

Hi Tom,

Having reached the limit of my patience in trying to post original images, I have piggybacked a "Lazy Jacks" page onto one of my web sites. This is a diagram and explanation of the system. As I said, the total cost was somewhere around $ 50.00 in 2000 as I only had to buy the carabiners and blocks the rest being on hand.

http://www.my-flashcards.com/rhapsody/

Werner


This is Werner's image from his site -- nice illustratation....and the stack pak is a real nice bonus to the system.

On Pygmalion I find the that the above works pretty good.

Right click on the image and paste into the reply and resize to fit.

Jay

Last modified: 11 Jul 2011 9:27 PM | Jay Bietz (Administrator)

Message Author Message Content   (20 of 55)
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Jay Bietz
(Administrator)

Here is a link to the picasa site for the start of the SHLP race.

Here are some links to YouTube video's.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q6c67uWQjQY

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MEDHudGXQ4s

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dleYDnmu0vI

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZPoYkA7hCvs

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4GuIQoqdgZA

Thanks to Danielle Machado for providing the images and allowing their use.

Near the starting line - before the start.

Randy current position at the last update can be found here. http://www.pacificcup.org/OpenLayers/longpac.php


Message Author Message Content   (21 of 55)
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Jay Bietz
(Administrator)

Randy Leasure and Tortuga W32 will be starting the SSS Long Pac on July 6, 2011... For more information see Singlehanded Sailing Society page and the race transponder page.

The course is described from the race instructions...

STARTING LINE

6.1 The starting line is between an orange stripe on the Golden Gate Yacht Club race deck and the 'X' buoy off the Golden Gate Yacht Club, leaving the buoy to starboard.

6.2 If the 'X' buoy is missing, the Race Committee will attempt to set a temporary mark to replace the 'X' buoy. If this is not possible, the start line will then be an imaginary line extending 500 yards northwards from the Golden Gate Yacht Club race deck, and the Race Committee will call the start via VHF channel 71.

7 COURSE

7.1 The course is from the start, to any point on longitude 126 degrees 40 minutes West [this modifies RRS 28.1], then to the finish.

8 FINISH

8.1 The finish line is from the orange stripe on the Golden Gate Yacht Club race deck, extending through 'X' buoy and 50 yards beyond. The line shall be crossed leaving the race deck to starboard.

Go Randy -- Safely of course...

Tortuga seen below at the 2009 NCalifornia Rondy.

Last modified: 02 Jul 2011 12:40 PM | Jay Bietz (Administrator)

Message Author Message Content   (22 of 55)
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David Wiencke
(Member)

Jay Bietz wrote:
David Wiencke wrote:

I have a photo of that set-up on my boat. Not sure how to post it here. Is there a way??

I rigged it up after the first few times anchoring and finding the problem with "sailing" at anchor and especially the bobstay chafe. This cures both problems. The Pardey's described using this set-up on their first boat, even through a hurricane. I made a wooden ropestrop block that has worked well. I figure the rope strop absorbs some shock load and will certainly let go before the bowsprit gets pulled off taking the rig with it. Actually, with this set-up, the boat's whole rig acts to dampen any shockloads.


David: I just posted a how to at New Web Site - a copy and paste should work.

Thanks Jay. I tried the copy/paste from my computer before, which didn't work, and now I've uploaded the photos to the picasa site and it looks like it will work.

The set-up on Neverland: 50" of chain, 250" nylon rode, snubber attached with rolling hitch to rode (or chain), runs up through a block at end of bowsprit and back through hawspipe to samson post.

Here's a photo I saved from Dick's site when I was looking at how others had delt with the bobstay-chafe/sailing thing a few years back.

Our first sail with Neverland was down Chesapeake Bay with two days of 30-40kt winds and higher gusts coming right up the bay. Our second anchorage was protected from the wind by only a low thin strip of land and we were buffeted by gusts all night that heeled us way over and sailed us back and forth. Even with a snubber rigged similarly to Dick's picture above the rode was playing the bobstay like bow on a violin string. Not a good night's sleep. That's when I decided to try the block at the end of the bowsprit. Of course, we've rarely experienced such extreme anchoring conditions since, but I'm very happy with the set-up.

Last modified: 28 Jun 2011 2:45 PM | David Wiencke

Message Author Message Content   (23 of 55)
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Jay Bietz
(Administrator)

Here is how you post images to a forum topic.

Here I open my Picasa site and selected the image in a full sized view, right clicked on the image and choose copy then went back to the WOA topic message body and right click and choose paste.

To use your WOA photo Album, from the lower left menu under your login name select View Profile > Member Photo Albums > Select your album to view all the images you have uploaded -- right click on your image and choose copy.

Move to the forum and your topic and while editing in the body of the topice right click and choose paste. When your image is selected in the topic use the corner boxes to resize to fit.

Hint: I found that opening two tabs one to the forum and one to your photo album made it easier to repeat the image posting.

From my WOA photo album of Pygmalion's aft keel, rudder and fin...

Hope this helps.

Last modified: 26 Jun 2011 10:59 AM | Jay Bietz (Administrator)

Message Author Message Content   (24 of 55)
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Gary Burton
(Member)

Spot the difference?
Before:


After:


Last modified: 21 Jun 2011 11:14 PM | Gary Burton

Message Author Message Content   (25 of 55)
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Gary Burton
(Member)

Tate, here is something to make you drool over. Bob Knoblochs boat Soltero:


More here:

Message Author Message Content   (26 of 55)
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Jay Bietz
(Administrator)

From Westsails at play

Werner - nice catch... here is the thumb nail.

Capt. Marlena - another thought is to find the WS 32 image you like and have a Computer Graphic Artist (ie not me) change the hull color to what ever you want - now days pretty simple. Also when you book is released - I'd be happy to add a link to our site for our members to purchase etc.

Jay

Last modified: 13 May 2011 11:02 PM | Jay Bietz (Administrator)

Message Author Message Content   (27 of 55)
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Gary Burton
(Member)


Last modified: 09 Feb 2011 10:23 AM | Gary Burton

Message Author Message Content   (28 of 55)
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Gary Burton
(Member)

Went sailing last Saturday in about 25 knots of wind. Started out with yankee and one reef in the main, but the rail was in the water so put another reef in the main.
We were not able to go very fast, about 5.5 to 6 knots on a beam reach and slightly less at about 60 degrees of apparent wind.
A boat that was out took some pictures, that show a bow in the headstay and that the jib luff was not near tight enough.
So my question is: how much does this affect boatspeed? I also have too much weight in the stern so need to address this as well..






Last modified: 07 Feb 2011 10:04 AM | Jay Bietz (Administrator)

Message Author Message Content   (29 of 55)
- Archived Message from Inactive Forum -

Jay Bietz

TB

One more try.

http://picasaweb.google.com/jaybietz/Boomkin#

Message Author Message Content   (30 of 55)
- Archived Message from Inactive Forum -

Aaron Norlund

Rich,

Something like this would surely work, but I'd probably want to through-bolt it to the outside of the bulwark.

cleat

Pop-up Cleats


Best!
Aaron

Message Author Message Content   (31 of 55)
- Archived Message from Inactive Forum -

Jay Bietz

Sailing is so exciting.... Yesterday while on a reach across the slot and just as we reached the east side of Alcatraz island in the SF bay, a Toggle Bolt (I think this is the right word) end popped off and in rapid order the boomkin's shattered and I scrambled to douse the sails.

The remaining end of the T/B shows rust on the exposed end indicating that the break has been there for some time.

Aft

All photo's at

http://picasaweb.google.com/jaybietz/Boomkin#

I'm thinking that Bud will have more business soon.

Message Author Message Content   (32 of 55)
- Archived Message from Inactive Forum -

Michael Dougan

Normally, we don't do commercial posts in the message board, but a Westsail owner who developed a storage rack system for his boat, has now started a company to sell them and he has generously offered to sell them to members at a 20% discount. It's an interesting concept, so, what the heck, here is his letter:

My name is Neil Malik and I am the President and Founder of Barrington Marine http://www.sailboatrack.com/

I was also the Owner of "Wanti".,Hull #258 which I sailed from the US to the Azores, Europe and finally Brazil via the Canary Islands and Cape Verde. My company, Barrington Marine, specializes in the design, development, production and marketing of the world's first sailboat rack system. The rack system
allows sailors to utilize the space below the boom but above the deck to carry all sorts of gear. I used the rack very succesfully on my Westsail during my North and South Atlantic crossings.

The rack system does not require any drilling and adapts to any teak or stainless handrails which are found on the majority of sailboats. The rack would accommodate most yachts between 20' and 60' as the crossbar is adjustable both in length and in height.

The rack is extremely useful for a multitude of applications including the use of automotive cargo boxes as modern day sea chests (for fenders, dock lines, spare sails, lifejackets, companionway doors, etc.), solar panels, rigid and inflatable dinghies, kayaks, surfboards, lengthy items (such as poles, oars and gaffs), liferaft canisters,etc.

The rack has been tested in 6 Atlantic gales and 2 squalls. It was used on my Westsail 32 as shown below to carry my rigid dinghy and surfboard
equipment.

I have just launched my new company with ads placed in Cruising World and Blue Water Sailing for the July, August and September issues. So far response has been positive with growing activity on the web. The Retail price is $549 for a full system.

Since I personally know that the Barrington Marine Sailboat Rack System would be ideal on a Westsail, I would like to know if there was a way we could develop a partnership together between your members and my company. I have some ideas in mind. For example, I would be willing to offer all members a 20% discount off of any rack purchase as well as to throw in a free pair of rack straps. This is a $130 savings fropm the retails price. I?d also
be interested in being a gear sponsor of your site and your newsletter.

Please feel free to contact me directly.
Regards,
Neil

first

second

Neil K. Malik
President & Founder
Barrington Marine, Inc.
Barrington, RI USA
Lat N41.74 Lon W71.32
Tel: (617)-233-7161
Tel: (401)-626-4650
Fax: (401) 633-6670
Mobile: (617)-233-7161
e: _barringtonmarine@aol.com_ (mailto:barringtonmarine@aol.com)
web: _www.sailboatrack.com_ (http://www.sailboatrack.com/)
Skype: sailboatrack

Message Author Message Content   (34 of 55)
- Archived Message from Inactive Forum -

Gary and Charlotte Burton

W32 with some hurricane damage. Looks like she lost her bowsprit and rubbed against a piling on the stbd quarter. The owner seems very anxious to sell....
image
image
image
http://houston.craigslist.org/boa/1031230788.html

Message Author Message Content   (35 of 55)
- Archived Message from Inactive Forum -

Aaron Norlund

Frank,

Mystic Stainless makes a nice boarding ladder. Here are a few photos of one on a BCC:

one
two
three

You can find out more at:
Mystic Stainless

Hope this helps!
Aaron N.

Message Author Message Content   (36 of 55)
- Archived Message from Inactive Forum -

Aaron Norlund

Hey all,

I finally took a few photos of the LEDs we installed under the handrail in the galley. There is a toggle switch mounted in a whole one of the previous owners drilled the bulkhead for God only knows what:

leds1
leds2

For larger photos, visit:
Asia Marie General Photos

Happy days to you!
Aaron N.

Message Author Message Content   (37 of 55)
- Archived Message from Inactive Forum -

Aaron Norlund

Hey all,

I've been annoyed at not having a secure place to keep a winch handle near the mast. I've seen the store-bought variations, but was dissatisfied with how they mount. So I created this holder for my mast.

It's a 3" PVC cut a tad longer than my longest winch handle. I drilled holes and seized two sail hanks two it, and two holes for a keep strap. The strap is tubular webbing with bungy cord as a "core"; it is stopper-knotted in place and holds the handle securely in the pipe. The point of the webbing is to keep the bungy from degrading quickly.

The photo should make it clearer.

handleholder

For larger images, click here:
Asia Marie General Photos

Best!
Aaron N.

Message Author Message Content   (38 of 55)
- Archived Message from Inactive Forum -

Ralph and Sandra Weiland

Scott:

This kind of device is a Charlie Noble. They can be pretty and expensive or less expensive and just as functional. I use one from West Marine (see their 2008 catalog at p 534) that looks like one of these:

Rain Caps

There's a prettier one at http://store.hamiltonmarine.com/browse.cfm/4,3118.html.

Hope this helps,

Ralph

Message Author Message Content   (39 of 55)
- Archived Message from Inactive Forum -

George and Rayna Shaunfield

Here is the actual fuel polishing setup on a Cape Dory 36 (s/v Arial) that they mounted on Star Board. See http://www.ariel-cd36.org/projects_fuelsystem.html for the complete article with more photos. System has been in use for 4 years.
-George

Arial fuel polishing

Message Author Message Content   (40 of 55)
- Archived Message from Inactive Forum -

Michael Dougan

Sannyasin W32 #479 Rare gaff-rigged Westsail, very traditional throughout. Aries Windvane, Simrad TP30, GPS(2), Loran. Very good condition, lots of spares, sail it away. $45K

See link for more information http://www.greatsoftware.net/Sannyasin or contact Michael at 917-544-1662

at the dock

galley

under sail

Message Author Message Content   (41 of 55)
- Archived Message from Inactive Forum -

Aaron Norlund

Hey all, here are some more pictures; to keep load times and bandwidth down on the board, use this link:

Photo Album of Rewiring

This sort of explains the whole process though:
In the hanging locker

Fair leads!
Aaron N.

Message Author Message Content   (42 of 55)
- Archived Message from Inactive Forum -

Aaron Norlund

Hey all,

I promise we're doing work! We're almost done with the engine bay - in fact, we'd planned on putting the engine in last weekend but, with our rendezvous going flat, we're going to take some more time. I promise I'll post more pictures of the boat!

But to tide you all over, here's our new electric panel (though it's not quite done yet.) It's being made by Mobile Marine Electronics (www.wewireboats.com).

Electric Panel

Fair leads,
Aaron N.

Message Author Message Content   (44 of 55)
- Archived Message from Inactive Forum -

Fcheney

Well I ended up not having to move the boat - the water is still very low (maybe Alberto will help w/ that) So David brought over his chain winch and just removed the engine at my dock - first the tranny, then the rest of it, went very smoothly I must say... It will be ready for re-installation in about another week. In the meantime, I'm cleaning and painting parts of the engine room and also ordering a new instrument panel from Trans-Atlantic Diesels in Virginia... http://www.tadiesels.com/instrument_panel.html
I'm gonna try to post a couple of pics of the operation here...
Engine removal1
Engine removal2
Engine removal3

I'll post again at the next step...
Fred
W32 Great Writ #629

Message Author Message Content   (45 of 55)
- Archived Message from Inactive Forum -

Rich Morpurgo
(Member)

I have never seen one like this.

pilothouse

http://newimages.yachtworld.com/1/3/9/0/2/1390209_1.jpg

Message Author Message Content   (46 of 55)
- Live Message on Active Forum -

Unknown
(Unregistered User)

I'm in the process of creating an Inventory Management System for Drifter, in order to help keep track of everything while I'm off cruising. Even in my workshop at home (my used-to-be-workshop in my use-to-be-home), it seemed that I spent half my total work-time trying to find a specific tool, supply, etc. I can only imaging the challenge I'll face when everything is stuffed into a boat of approximately 4% of the total square footage!

The final system will be database-driven and allow the reallocation of an item category from one locker to another with a single drag-n-drop. The application will depend upon first identifying each storage location, then assigning locations to item categories. Although the app requires the installation of a database and web server running on the laptop, it occurred to me that the base template might be useful to others, for a manually-run system.

Although the template isn't completed, I'm posting a thumbnail of it here, to see if others might find it helpful. If there's interest, I can provide a copy of the final, full-size template, once it's finished.

Jack




Last modified: 06 Sep 2011 2:40 AM | Jack Webb

Message Author Message Content   (47 of 55)
- Live Message on Active Forum -

Christian Calagan
(Member)

Dear... Anyone-Who-Wants-To-Read
(except for my disapproving wife),

Wow! My long history of internet impotence may finally be over! To date, I still haven't figured out how to get my newsletter, but thanks to some pointers from Jay the WOA administrator, I think I now know how to get some comments on the website. Beware though, I have merely gone from computer illiterate to the Dick & Jane Reader, so I am bound to screw up on a regular basis, if I haven't already. If anyone wants to point out what I'm doing wrong (except my wife) or offer any suggestions (except my wife), feel free. My hope is to let everyone know what I'm up to (except my wife), not that anyone cares. I also hope to meet some new friends to correspond with.
I could really use some new friends, since I don't have any friends at all. To be perfectly honest, I have had very few friends in my life, and I am now in my late (very late) 50's. I've never been able to figure out why this is. All my life, other people have told me that I'm "arrogant" and "obnoxious." Maybe that's it. I would probably have taken their word for it a long time ago and tried to change, were it not for the fact that they have all been such really arrogant and obnoxious people. Oh, by the way, as you might already suspect, I'm a single-hander, but not only because I have no one to sail with.

So here goes!

I was born at a very young age and all that... but this present interest in communication all started when I showed up for this past summer's Florida rendezvous at the end of a tow rope on the Monday night after it was held. When I learned that people there had heard of my overdue status, I thought maybe I should post something on the website to report on how things turned out, just in case anyone besides my wife might have been interested (I already knew that she wasn't). Well, better late than never (maybe).

In June of this year, I bought a W32 on Ebay...... I guess I just hoped and figured surely the ship was at least ready to go to the rendezvous in Port Canaveral. By the time I cleared the inlet at Mayport, the motor shut down and wouldn't restart. Oh well, the winds were fair and I hate to motor anyway, so off I went at a fairly nice Westsail clip. I really enjoyed myself (and, of course, getting away from my wife). Conditions held for darn near an entire hour before I was becalmed. Basically, I drifted from there to St. Augustine over the course of the next three days, whereupon I anchored just beyond the breakers for the night. The next morning I floated in with the incoming tide, along with the rest of the ocean's daily debris.

Severely winded from hours of blowing on the sails, I managed to reach the dock at the Conch Island resort, where I was promptly told that I could not even tie up, let alone recharge my dead batteries. Turns out it didn't matter anyway. The two house batteries were already defunct, and the "new" 3-year-old start battery, was now fried extra crispy, thanks to a faulty, only-good-at-the-dock installation. I discovered later that day, that it had shifted in all the rocking and rolling during the previous doldrums. It got caught up on some "half-fast" wiring, and one of the posts, which was already cracked clean through from over-tightening, separated completely. Naturally, It then cuddled up to just the wrong exposed wire. Before its quick death by self-electrocution, it took out its revenge on the battery selector switch and a few of the active circuits. I spent the next couple of days hitching rides to town and back, and ferrying batteries and repair parts back and forth in the dingy. Finally, the boat was ready to leave for the rendezvous, now less than two weeks away (or so I thought).

Not me, however. I had to return to an angry, landlubbering wife in West Virginia, who had been storing up volumes of lectures and sermons, to share with me upon my return. As usual, most were about my innumerable "problems" and misdoings. Believe it or not, only a few dozen of these are about me buying a boat when we couldn't afford it and even fewer about how I have no business cruising at my age after being out of sailing for 25 years. No matter, she makes up in repetition for what she lacks in quantity. Of course, I also needed to tend to her needs (which I never seem to do) and also to make up for the time I was away, not being there to not meet her needs.

Then of course, I had to tend to the needs of the broken-down, depression-era homestead that we had bought 15 years ago in the heart of Appalachia. In this category, I had a honey-do list consisting of more pages than War and Peace. We fled to this beautiful WV hollow in the 90's to escape our, believe-it-or-not, fairly good and almost "normal" suburban life in Pasco County, just north of Tampa/St. Pete. Nevertheless, I couldn't stand to live in the decaying civilization around me for one more day (and that was in the mid 90's!). We had originally intended to fix the place up and enjoy the rural-mountain lifestyle, but to date, have done neither. Anyway, after patching holes in the roof (which still leaks) chasing cows, feeding chickens, etc, etc, etc, I returned to St. Augustine, secure in the knowledge that the boat was as willing and eager to get to the rendezvous as I was. Wrong again.

Deja Vu. The minute I cleared the jetty and turned south, the motor conked out and wouldn't restart (this time, fortunately for me). I immediately assumed further problems with the electrical system and even began the eulogy for all three of my brand new batteries. No such luck. This time, ALL of the oil had leaked out of the motor into the bilge. This was "fortunate" in that the shutdown was in lieu of a 4-108 self-destruction of biblical proportions. Of course, I didn't know this at the time, so it was a rather sickening feeling. In any event, I didn't have time to grieve anyway, since the first in a long line of squalls had just arrived, right on cue.

Early on during the next few hours of storms, the main bilge pump and float switch were dislodged from their respective half-fast, dock-only mountings. Not much of a loss though, in that the bilge pump was never to work again anyway. Unbeknownst to oil-soaked me, it had also joined the ranks of the permanently unemployed, already-croaked, backup bilge pump, which was also bobbing around in the messy little BP coffin beneath my feet. It was too bad I hadn't brought my seafaring cat "Ferdinand" (he prefers "Ferdy") along with me. He could have at least warned me about the rising crude levels in the cabin.

This was all really bad timing (as if there could be good timing) in that the stuffing box had been leaking badly the whole way. Apparently, after so many years of sitting at the dock running only occasionally for short periods in neutral, even my limited minutes of motoring did in it's long-suffering stuffing. Oh well, that's why God made buckets and dirty laundry. I must say though, I was thoroughly impressed with the amount of oil-saturated bilge water a Westsail could hold with a little help from the main cabin. (Did you know that oil and water do mix as long as you keep shaking them vigorously?) Anyway, after my saltwater and oil martini were thoroughly shaken AND stirred (with me as the olive), I welcomed the next three days of windlessness as an opportunity to clean up the mess, which took every bit of those three days.

Actually, I had noticed oil in the bilge while in St. Augustine. .... Having done the same thing in St. Augustine (topped it off, not spilled it) I couldn't have known that a fatal leak had snuck onto the stage, ready to drain the engine of its life-sustaining blood at the start of act III. This, of course, was the moment I left St. Augustine in an outgoing tide and west wind. The good news in all of this was that it didn't matter that my slippery, black, bare foot dropped me hard onto the gearshift cable in the engine compartment, snapping it off at the adjusting nut. I wasn't going do be doing any motoring anyway, so "no harm" (except to my bleeding foot) no foul!"

I really couldn't complain about the constant string of afternoon and evening storms that I got for that next three days either, because they provided the only 1 knot+ forward progress I was able to make toward the rendezvous, which was now likely well into Sunday brunch). As luck would have it (and my luck would absolutely, positively have it), the wind in the last blow was from the South, so out to sea I went heading "westsail southeast" (if you have a W32, you know what that means; for the other one of you who doesn't, it means "not quite southeast, although you'll never admit it no matter what the compass says.) I reasoned that surely this passing storm wind would hold up for the next 10 to 12 hours that I needed to get to the Rendezvous, just in time to say goodbye to all the new friends I had just failed to make.

So this, obviously, was the first misjudgment I myself made of my own accord....... No, I don't want to see the list you've been compiling while reading this "blog" or "posting" or whatever it is. In fact, for your condescending information, the forecast for overnight and Sunday was for 10 to 15 knots out of the south, so it wasn't all that stupid.

Speaking of which... Is anyone still reading? (assuming, of course, that anyone ever started in the first place) If so, I'd better wind this up before I loose my very first "bloggee" or "follower" or whatever it is that you are (assuming you "are" at all). To be honest, I don't even know if I will be able to upload this dribble (is that the right word?) onto the website. No! I didn't mean is "dribble" the right word, I meant, is "upload" the right word! So... cutting to the towboat chase...

Needless to say, the wind dropped to about 5 and turned southwesterly the very moment (REALLY!) I tacked to head in, about 30 miles northeast of the cape. Confident that I had at least made the turn short of the gulf stream, I did manage to make about 2 knots westsail south and westsail west tacking furiously back and forth the rest of the day against the 2 or so knots of northbound current. (Naturally, I forgot about the edy that often hangs out between the stream and the Canaveral shoals.) When the wind let up this last time, my 15-year-old, intermittently working, hand-held GPS at least had the decency to tell me that I was now 20 miles out and moving northbound at 2. This reliable, high-tech knowledge, in concert with the state of mind that I was in by that time, combined to make me do something I would almost never do if it could possibly be avoided, even though I was a Boat US member. I could take going nowhere, or even drifting off course, but at that point, the thought of returning to Jacksonville involuntarily was more than I could bear.

My provisions barely held out until the tow boat arrived for the leisurely, 3-hour tow to the PCYC dock. This finally ended my agonizing odyssey, technically, in the wee hours of Tuesday morning. I slept well the last hour of that night, not because I was safe in port, but because I was so soothed by the fact that I didn't have to pay the imaginary $1,200 tow bill (which is not at all imaginary if you aren't a member). I was also relieved to be tied to the dock, secure in the fact that over the course of the next several years, I could run back and forth between Cape Canaveral, West Virginia and the Tampa Bay area (where I have sick, elderly parents and other family members) while scrounging up enough money to get a mechanic and the parts and the rest of the wherewithal to conduct the necessary repairs. This is exactly what I did, but by some miraculous early parole, this, my most resent stint in boating purgatory (as of that time) only lasted over the course of the next couple of months.

I did make some acquaintances among the very nice and hospitable folks at the PCYC that summer, including Charley & Pavi, who had hosted the rendezvous. I also got to see the last space shuttle go up. So don't feel too bad for me. After all, a bad day sailing is still better than a good day fishing, right? Well, I don't guess I believe that myself, and not just because I love to fish. Despite everything, for some strange and undoubtedly idiotic reason, I was still enthused at this point, about both the "new" boat and my Westsailing horizons.

Come to think of it, I am, even now, still enthused about this boat and our future together, despite the subsequent shipwreck we had during the leg from Key West to my home dock in Hudson, FL. That trip ended just last week, followed by my return to West Virginia the other day. For some strange reason, my wife stayed in FL, so I got back here just in time to spend Christmas by myself. Tonight is Christmas Eve and here I sit in front of my barely smoldering fire, luxuriating in the dreary, depressing, cold, and wet WV weather. Oddly enough, it seems comforting to know that the weather is trying its best to sympathize with me by attempting to match my melancholy mood.

Tonight I have to choose between freezing or building the fire up, which will then prohibit Santa from coming down the chimney. Oh well, he would only be bringing me coal for my stockings anyway, which stockings I plan to wear while I sleep tonight so my feet don't go numb. So I guess I'd better sign off for now and go find some furniture to burn. Yes, tomorrow is Christmas Day, and I am here by myself in my half-broken-down, half-fixed-up, leaking farmhouse instead of spending the holidays with family in the Sunshine State, a thousand miles away, mocking me as it basks in its daily 81 degree highs. My only cosolation is that Southern Belle is still afloat (barely) and eager to devour more of my blood, sweat, tears, time, and most of all, MONEY, so we can go sailing again. (Well, that and also that my wife stayed in Florida.)

Since I've given up on trying to get the wet firewood to burn anyhow, perhaps tomorrow I'll wrap myself in blankets and write some more about my subsequent misadventures while I enjoy my frozen Christmas TV dinner. That's assuming that even I myself want to hear any more. Pretty pathetic, huh? Feel bad for me?.... then write me a dang email! I don't get lonely on the boat, but this place is eerily depressing, especially now on a dark Christmas Eve.

Also, while you're at it, have a great Christmas, whoever you are. What?... no one's reading at all? Oh well, the important stuff is already in the Bible, so nothing I could write really needs to be written anyway. Even in that case, "Merry Christmas to the dark night and all the ships at sea! Most of all,

Glory to God in the Highest!

And to all, a good night.

Christian

P.S. Oh! I forgot to mention that this is my second Westsail. I sold my first one back in April to buy this one (really).
Edited for content by Admins 12/31/2011.
Last modified: December 31, 2011 1:35 PM | Jay Bietz (Administrator)

Message Author Message Content   (48 of 55)
- Live Message on Active Forum -

David Wiencke
(Member)

Elena's coaming

Last modified: October 24, 2011 7:12 PM | David Wiencke

Message Author Message Content   (49 of 55)
- Live Message on Active Forum -

Braden Prickett
(Member)

Werner Hamp wrote:

I have the standard hinged two lid ice box on my W32. It needs to be re-insulated as I am spending a fortune for ice every month. Has anyone removed the liner from their ice box intact by removing the top teak trim and galley post ? If so, please share your experience (nightmare) with me before I attempt to do it.

Thanks,

Werner


We recently removed our liner/insulation for the same reason. The insulation was pretty thin and had quite a few voids.

There were quite a few more pieces of trim/support pieces than I initially thought and the trick in ours was that the fiberglass liner goes under the trim/counter all the way to the port side of the hull. Without really doing some damage, we cut the fiberglass/insulation with a fein tool at the point it went under the counter. Our intent was to increase storage and install an Engel portable unit. The section that remains under the port galley lockers we'll either glass in and use for a small ice chest, or do some fancy work with the fein to get it out.

We're not done yet, but it has not been particularly tough...I'll get some pictures up shortly.

engel

icebox

icebox

icebox


Last modified: September 04, 2011 4:55 PM | Braden Prickett

Message Author Message Content   (50 of 55)
- Live Message on Active Forum -

David Wiencke
(Member)

We had a non-working mast-mounted radar that chafed the halyards and the staysail leech. Removed it, when after lowering the mast (do-it-yourself method), it got in the way of sliding the mast back on the bow pulpit roller. I think there were 5 SS screws on each side of the mast bracket. I simply put the screws back in the holes.

This spring mounted a new radar and wind generator on a pole on the boomkin.


Message Author Message Content   (51 of 55)
- Live Message on Active Forum -

David Wiencke
(Member)

My winter project is to build a new (improved) rudder for Neverland. After one good season with the old repaired rudder, water found it's way inside this spring after launching and activated some uncured foam causing the rudder to split open. In the past this happened over the winter when water trapped inside froze, expanded and split the rudder.

Split rudder last spring...and quick repair in the slings...

My plan is to laminate a few pieces of 1/2" marine plywood together, same profile shape, but thinner and tapered to about 1/4", then covered with fiberglass. Instead of being 3 1/2" thick, it will be about 1 1/2" (pintles are 1 1/4" dia) where it meets the rear of the boat. I plan to use silicon bronze straps (1/4"x1") to attach rudder to bronze pintles, using the same fiberglass gudgeons.

Is there anyone out there that has built a new/redisigned rudder on a W32? Any advise from experience or photos of rudder modifications would be welcome.

Last modified: November 29, 2011 7:15 PM | David Wiencke

Message Author Message Content   (52 of 55)
- Live Message on Active Forum -

Jay Bietz
(Administrator)

Norm Rhines wrote:I hope these links get you to the
photos.

and


Looks nice!

Here are the images above.

Looks good

I've thought about tapering the leading edge of Pygmalions rudder next time she is in the yard - short of the full Dave King hull modifications...

Last modified: December 03, 2011 10:33 AM | Jay Bietz (Administrator)

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